Thanks to Twitterrific 5.2

ad_52TigerI’d like to thank Twitterriffic 5.2 with push notifications for sponsoring the site this week. I’ve been using it for several days now and it’s great. In fact, I’ve finally been able to delete the app I was using just for push. 

If you want to get in on this, act fast. The Iconfactory is releasing this feature as a public beta, and the first 1,000 users who download the app and enable push will be able to try it out. So download Twitterrific 5.2. now, flick that setting to the on position and enjoy.

Each type of notification has an accompanying, color-coded symbol (below) so you can know exactly what has come in (DM, reply, mention, favorite, retweet or new follower) at a glance. If you dislike the color symbols, they can be turned off (I like them).

Push isn’t the only nice change in this update. Others include:

  • Profiles redesigned to display user banners
  • Discussions can now be shared via email & Storify
  • Droplr thumbnails now display in the timeline
  • The timeline can now display up to 600 tweets (was 400)
  • Various changes to make VoiceOver less verbose
  • Bug fixes, UI tweaks and much more

I’ve used Twitterrific since the beginning and I still believe it’s the way to go. From great new features like push to little niceties like the pull-to-refresh animation, it’s the iOS Twitter app for me. Get it now.

T52notes

Sponsor: Twitterrific 5.2 for iOS with push notifications

ad_52TigerBig thanks to the Iconfactory and Twitterriffic 5.2 with push notifications for sponsoring the site this week. Twitterrific is and has been my iOS Twitter client of choice, and version 5.2 with push notifications makes it even better.

This is a feature I’ve wanted for a long time. Now I no longer have to keep a second Twitter client installed simply for the notifications! Goodbye, other apps.

If you want to get in on this, act fast. The Iconfactory is releasing this feature as a public beta, and the first 1,000 users who download the app and enable push will be able to try it out. So download Twitterrific 5.2. now, flick that setting to the on position and enjoy.

Each type of notification has an accompanying, color-coded symbol (below) so you can know exactly what has come in (DM, reply, mention, favorite, retweet or new follower) at a glance. If you dislike the color symbols, they can be turned off (I like them).

Push isn’t the only nice change in this update. Others include:

  • Profiles redesigned to display user banners
  • Discussions can now be shared via email & Storify
  • Droplr thumbnails now display in the timeline
  • The timeline can now display up to 600 tweets (was 400)
  • Various changes to make VoiceOver less verbose
  • Bug fixes, UI tweaks and much more

I’ve used Twitterrific since the beginning and I still believe it’s the way to go. From great new features like push to little niceties like the pull-to-refresh animation, it’s the iOS Twitter app for me. Get it now.

T52notes

Final Touches: Twitterrific

Final Touches celebrates the tiny details that make an app a delight to use. Not the marquee features, but the fun, thoughtful bits that make you smile. The final touches.

flyolliefly

Twitterrific 5.0 for the iPhone added a slew of new features to the veteran Twitter client. My favorite little touch is the Ollie animation that accompanies the pull-to-refresh gesture. As you begin the gesture, a tiny egg appears. Continue the motion and the egg cracks open and Ollie emerges. He flaps his wings as the feed refreshes and finally disappears with a pop.

It’s just plain fun and I enjoy watching it every time. Good job, Iconfactory.

5 things to like about Twitterrific 5

Ollie, Twitter’s elder statesman 1 and official unofficial Twitter logo, is flapping his wings (literally) in Twitterrific 5 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch (universal, $2.99 launch price). This update is a clean slate for The Iconfactory and Twitterrific customers. There’s much to enjoy in this version, and I’ve picked my top five. Here they are, in no particular order:

A Customizable Theme 2

You expect Iconfactory products to look good, and Twitterrific 5 does. What’s fun is that you can affect that to a degree. Once your account credentials are set up, tap your avatar and then the “AA” button to produce the theme customization screen. From here, you can:

  • Select one of five fonts
  • Make user avatars larger or smaller
  • Increase or decrease font size
  • Choose a light or dark theme
  • Adjust the spacing between lines
  • Adjust brightness

My aging eyes prefer the light theme, large icons and huge lettering with lots of space in between. You youngsters may differ.

Swipe to Reply

Previous version of Twitterrific let you determine what a double- or triple-tap did. For instance, you could have a double-tap create a reply and a triple-tap a retweet. I liked that. Now I wonder how I lived with it. Twitterrific 5 employes gestures in a clever way. To reply to a tweet, simply swipe right. A composition window appears with your target user’s handle in place. Super.

Swipe to View a Conversation

You know where this is going. Swipe left to view the conversation surrounding a tweet.

It’s Crazy Fast

Perform a gesture to compose a reply or view a conversation and boom, it’s there. Pull to refresh (that’s right, pull to refresh in Twitterrific!) and the timeline refreshes. It’s crazy fast.

Timeline Refresh Animation

When you pull to refresh your timeline, you’re treated to a delightful animation. Ollie bursts from his egg, flaps his wings and then disappears into a flash as the update is completed.

You’re going to say, “That’s just a bit of fun,” to which I’ll say, you’re right! Software can be fun! A feature can have no purpose other than to make the user smile. The first person who says “gamification” gets punched in the junk. Lighten up and have some fun.

There’s more, of course, like my beloved color coding. Each type of tweet you’ll compose (public, mention and DM) has its own color. Those colors are more subtle in v.5 but not gone. No more horror-stricken moments of, “Dear God, I hope that was a DM.”

Twitterrific 5 is a swell app that will remain on my iPhone’s home screen for the foreseeable future.

  1. Note that post from 2007 still says “post” instead of “tweet.”
  2. Watch as my iPhone’s battery drops closer and closer to zero across these screenshots.

Three reasons to use Twitterrific

Instead of writing a long-winded review, I’ll opt for simplicity with three reasons to use Twitterrific. You’ll find more mini reviews here.

Not since the Cola Wars of the 1980’s has the world seen such an epic battle for consumer dollars. The Great Twitter App Wars of the early 2000’s have spawned debate and some fantastic apps for iOS and Mac OS X. My favorite is Twitterrific. Here are three reasons to use the recently-released Twitterrific 4 for Mac.

  1. Color coding. Many people have publicly posted a tweet that was meant to be a direct message. Twitterrific lens a hand by color-coding your tweets, both sent and received. Direct messages are blue, mentions are brown and your own tweets are green. Timeline tweets are either black or white, depending on the theme you’ve selected. Best of all, a direct message is a darker brown than a tweet that simply mentions you. All of this makes it super easy to see what’s what at a glance.
  2. The collapsable sidebar. The Twitterrific sidebar displays lots of useful information, like tweets, messages, mentions and favorites, plus saved searches, lists and trends. I like to run it fully collapsed, so that only each function’s icon is visible (see above). It saves a lot of space on my MacBook Air’s little display.
  3. Multiple timelines. From the Timeline menu, select New Timeline (Command-T) to open a new window to follow a second (or third, etc.) account. For those of you who must monitor more than one account at a time, this works well. Otherwise, you can keep one window open and use Command-J to toggle between accounts. Note that the paid version is required for multiple account support.

There’s much more to this app, and I suggest you check it out here. Asking people about their preferred Twitter client has nearly become as personal as religion. Dozens of options exist, some differing only slightly, so you’ve got to find that one aspect that wins you over. For me, it was these three.